MOBILITY AND THE MEASUREMENT OF WELL-BEING IN HANOI AND HO CHI MINH CITY

DINH VU TRANG NGAN (ndinh@fetp.vnn.vn)
JONATHAN PINCUS (Jonathan.Pincus@fetp.vnn.vn)

One of the most glaring anomalies in the analysis of poverty in Asia is the low estimates of urban poverty reported by official statistical agencies and aid donors. Although great disparities in wealth and living conditions are readily apparent to even casual observers of Asia’s megacities, official surveys consistently portray cities that are virtually free from poverty and destitution. Just to cite a few examples, the official urban headcount poverty rate in China—a country that has become manufacturer to the world based on its comparative advantage in cheap labour—was just 3.8 percent in 2007 (Wu et al. 2010, 3). The corresponding rate for Thailand in 2006 was a mere 3.1 percent (Warr 2008). The official urban poverty rate in Indonesia, the poorest of these three countries, was just 1.9 percent in 2009. World Bank researchers estimate that in 2002 urban poverty for the entire East Asia Pacific region was just 2.3 percent (Ravallion et al. 2007, 38). Vietnam’s urban poverty rate is also low—just 3.3 percent in 2008 according to the General Statistics Office.

Đọc toàn văn tại: Mobility and the Measurement of Well-Being in Hanoi and HCMC

 

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